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Art and Architecture

Discover the Park's Prized Works in Art and Architecture

Much like the unique history and culture of New Orleans, City Park’s aesthetic is a “gumbo” of styles that draw from myriad artistic influences spanning the park’s history, from turn of the century architecture to sculptures by modern masters. 

Although some of the park’s earliest relics have been lost to time and the elements, noteworthy works remain. The petite iron Storyteller Gazebo in Storyland is one of the park’s oldest pieces, relocated from Bayou Metairie in the 1980s. The Pizatti Gate and Spanish Mission style Casino Building (a.k.a. Timken Center) are the earliest surviving structures in the park. Classical Greek motifs, a popular style in early 20th Century New Orleans, are evident in the Peristyle, Popp Bandstand and Popp Fountain. Modern works are also tucked into the landscape of City Park, from the whimsical fairytale sculptures in Storyland to the collection of works by modern artists inside the Besthoff Sculpture Garden.

City Park owes much of its art and architecture to the 1930s Works Progress Administration (WPA). This massive federal public works project put millions of people across the country to work building parks and roads, and employed scores of artists in public art projects. Most of the existing brick cottage-style outbuildings and Art Deco sculptures in the park were constructed during this time, and the landscape of City Park is dotted with original artwork from the WPA era. Sculptural elements range from bas-reliefs on bridges and surrounding Tad Gormley Stadium to sculptures in the Botanical Garden, where most of the WPA-era Art Deco works are located. Many of these sculptures were created by Enrique Alferez, a Mexican-born sculptor who lived in New Orleans and whose work can be seen on landmarks and buildings around the city.

We invite you to explore City Park beyond its natural elements and soak up a bit of the park’s history through its art and architecture. We like to think of City Park as a living museum – a place that not only preserves glimpses of the park’s origins, but one that embraces modern innovation and evolves with the needs of the community.

The WPA building Tad Gormley Stadium

The WPA building Tad Gormley Stadium

Works Progress Administration (WPA) and the Botanical Garden

The New Orleans Botanical Garden and City Park owes much of its artistic identity to the work of Mexican-born sculptor Enrique Alférez (1901-1999). When he arrived in New Orleans in 1929, Alférez had already acquired a national reputation for his Art Deco sculptures depicting elements of the natural landscape, created with industrial materials such as concrete and steel.

Inside the Botanical Garden, Alférez’s unique sculptures are set along the landscaped paths. Visitors can pick up a guide detailing the location and names of each work in the Botanical Garden inside the gift shop. Visitors can also see Alférez’s influence beyond the garden in bridge ornamentation and various sculptures throughout the park, most notably in the relief sculptures surrounding Tad Gormley Stadium and Popp Fountain. If you have a keen eye, you’ll spot Alférez’s subtle handiwork scattered across the park on the cement Art Deco Benches with Figures (1932), which depict animals and insects in relief, and Satyrs on Poles (1932), mythological creatures atop sculptural poles.

Bridge #1
Location: Palm Drive near Little Lake
One of two WPA bridges depicting hand tools, the bridge is a visual unification of art and construction – Alferez’s bas-relief sculpture is a nod to the WPA work in City Park done by hand, without the use of machinery.

Bridge #2
Location: Near NOMA, Christian Brothers School, next to Little Lake
Although two bridges in City Park depict the image of a floating woman in bas-relief, this bridge is unique in depicting both the floating woman and hand tools (see Bridge #1).

Grandjean Bridge Plaque (Bridge #3)
Location: Behind the New Orleans Museum of Art
This bridge, inscribed “WPA” and “1938”, was constructed in 1938 as a memorial to former Park Commissioner George H. Grandjean, a civil engineer who designed City Park’s original lagoons and developed an improvement plan for the park in 1894. The bridge is the third at this location – the first bridge was most likely made out of wood, and the second of concrete or iron. The sturdy, concrete WPA bridge has withstood the test of time – no reconstruction work has been required since the bridge was built.

Enrique Alferez Bridge (McFadden) (Bridge #4)
Location: Right side of NOMA, connecting two sections of Big Lake
This bridge is an example of Alferez’s move from the Art Deco style in the mid-1930s to a more streamlined, geometrical look. The bridge is sponsored by Douglas J. Allen and Carole T. Allen.

Bridge #5
Location: Street diagonal north of Interstate 610 near NOLA City Bark and the rugby field
The bas-relief sculpture on this bridge is another example of the unification of art and construction. It is said to depict an ideal working universe – scenes of men using hand tools, which represents the tremendous WPA works in City Park that were completed by hand, without the use of machinery.

Bridge #6
Location: Harrison Avenue, near the entrance of Couturie Forest
The City Park Volunteer Center is located between Bridge #6 and Bridge #7. This bridge demonstrates the shift from Alferez’s Art Deco style in the mid-1930s to a more streamlined, geometrical look.

Bridge #7
Location: Harrison Avenue, near Marconi
One of two bridges in the park with the bas-relief Art Deco floating woman, Bridge #7 also features the later geometrical designs. The City Park Volunteer Center is located between Bridge #6 and Bridge #7.

Bridge #8
Location: Harrison Avenue, near Wisner
Built in 1938 and bearing both the year and “WPA” stamp, this bridge shows the more streamlined geometrical design, evolved from Alferez’s Art Deco work.

Anseman Bridge (Bridge #10)
Location: Crossing Bayou Metairie on Anseman, next to Anseman Oak and the Old Grove
The bridge is named in honor of Victor Anseman (1842-1904), the “Father of City Park”. Anseman created the park’s governing board, served as volunteer manager, and was the first executive committee chairman. The original bridge, which crosses Bayou Metairie, was dedicated in 1928 but was replaced with the current, cement bridge in 1938 during the WPA. The bridge has streamlined, geometrical features and is outfitted with working lights.

Tad Gormley Stadium

Location: 5400 Stadium Drive

Originally known as City Park Stadium, the park’s major athletic venue was built 1935-1936 by the WPA. The stadium was re-named in 1965 in honor of Francis Thomas “Tad” Gormley, athletic director of City Park in 1938. In 2005, artist Michael Cain installed the two steel, cast glass and neon pieces above the entrance of the stadium. The work, inscribed “As We Watch Grace in Motion, Our Spirits Rise Together”, was inspired by Enrique Alferez’s WPA era bas-relief figures on the metal gates surrounding the stadium.
Fall weekends see fans of local high school football teams in the stands, but Tad Gormley Stadium has hosted major events from the Catholic Church’s Eighth National Eucharistic Congress in 1938 to a concert by The Beatles in 1964 to the 1992 US Olympic Track & Field Trials.

Roosevelt Mall Eagle Posts
Location: Along Roosevelt Mall
Built by the WPA (1936-1937), six of these Art Deco-style eagles on posts flank Roosevelt Mall.

McFadden Girl Scout Cabin

McFadden Girl Scout Cabin

McFadden Girl Scout Cabin
Architect Richard Koch and landscape architect William S. Wiedorn designed the Arts and Crafts style cabin, which was donated to City Park by William Harding and built in 1936 during WPA work in the park.

Conservatory

Conservatory

Art in the Botanical Garden

One of the finest (and few) existing examples of public garden design from the WPA period, the Botanical Garden – called the City Park Rose Garden at the time – opened in 1936. The original seven-acre garden was designed by landscape architect William S. Wiedorn, and the buildings are the work of architect Richard Koch. The garden consists of a series of formal garden rooms divided by axis (a feat in itself, considering the unusual shape of the garden’s plot).

Beyond the intriguing design and stunning variety of flora throughout the garden, the Botanical Garden is home to several sculptural works by artist Enrique Alferez.
The Shriever Fountain (1932) with The Water Maiden stands in the center of the parterre. The sculpture is signed by Alférez, a rare addition as Alferez often did not sign his works. Flanking the fountain are two bas-relief sculptures: Reclining Nude and Reclining Nude Eating Grapes. The parterre also contains two small fountains, each with an Art Deco sculpture depicting a Magnolia bud.

When the garden was enclosed in the early 1980s, Enrique Alférez was commissioned again to restore these original works and to create several new works. The Grass Gates (1982) were placed at the garden's original main entrance. The Sundial (1983) was placed at the center of the Benches with Figures. With the expansion of the garden in the mid 1990s, Alférez was commissioned a third time to create the largest of the sculptures in the garden: Flute Player (1995), which was placed in a restored fountain. Also in the garden: Woman in a Huipil (1981).

Renascence (1998), set in the border west of the Pavilion, was created a year before Alférez's death. It is the last sculpture placed in the garden and was Alferez’s final sculpture, a fitting end for the artist whose contributions to City Park spanned almost 70 years.

In addition to Alférez's works, several other sculptures are set in the garden, most notably Undine (1942) by Rose Marie Huth, located at the entrance to the conservatory, and Children on a Glide (1962) by Jean Sidenberg, located in the Palm Garden.

Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve
Artist:  Enrique Alférez
Cast Stone
On loan from Dr. Tlaloc Alférez

Owl
Artist: Enrique Alférez
Metal

Lark in the Park Gazebo (1995)
The gazebo, located near the entrance of the Pavilion of the two Sisters and the Botanical Garden Gift Shop, was paid for with funds raised by Lark in the Park in 1995. 

NOMA

NOMA

New Orleans Museum of Art

The city’s oldest fine arts institution is home to a permanent collection of 40,000 objects, with strong representation in European and American art, including works by Monet, Renoir, Picasso, Matisse, Jackson Pollock and Georgia O’Keefe. The New Orleans Museum of Art holds a several important works by French Impressionist Edgar Degas, who lived in New Orleans between 1871 and 1872, as well as collections of photography, glass, ceramics, Faberge eggs and Japanese paintings. The museum also hosts a range of world-class special and traveling exhibitions. In 1993, a $23 million expansion and renovation project, combined with the addition of noteworthy acquisitions, secured NOMA’s place in the top 25 percent of the nation’s largest and most important fine art museums.

The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden


The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, located to the left of NOMA and to the right of City Park’s Dueling Oak, is both a natural sanctuary and an outdoor sculpture museum. More than 60 sculptural works, valued above $25 million, are set around the garden’s five meandering acres. Stroll the garden’s footpaths and pedestrian bridges, by ancient live oaks draped in Spanish moss, and view incredible sculptures by artists from around the world. The collection includes work by master sculptors of the 20th century, including Antoine Bourdelle, Henry Moore, Jacques Lipchitz and Louise Bourgeois, as well as contemporary artists like Kenneth Snelson, Allison Saar, Joel Shapiro and Jean-Michel Othonielworth.

Wave (1988)
Artist: Lin Emery
Location: Formally in the fountain at the entrance of the New Orleans Museum of Art on Lelong Avenue. Currently: inside the Besthoff Sculpture Garden
This kinetic sculpture is made of highly polished aluminum, shaped into seven separate pieces representing waves, and moves with the wind. The piece, created by New Orleans native Lin Emery, was donated to the museum by Frederick R. Weisman and installed in 1988.
The fountain pool was given to the museum in 1912 by the sons of Fritz Jahncke, a German immigrant credited with paving the first streets in New Orleans and a shipyard magnate; Jahnke also helped build the Port of New Orleans. A Fritz Jahncke Fountain Plaque from 1912 sits at the foot of the pool. In 1928, Ernest Jahncke added the statue Hebe to the fountain, which was later replaced by Emery’s Wave.

Spirit Gates

Spirit Gates

Spirit Gates (1994)
Artist: John Scott

Location: NOMA exterior courtyard entrance, left of the museum building front

NOMA commissioned contemporary American artists John Scott and Deborah Butterfield to create Spirit Gates, a new expression in sculpture that combines utilitarian, kinetic and symbolic aesthetics. Scott’s work can be viewed in three positions: open, closed, or partially open, with each position representing an historical reference to the city. Fully open, the gates resemble identical twins and are inspired by African Ibeji twin figures. Partially open, the gates reference the pyramids of Egypt and the origins of architecture. Closed, the gates resemble the classic shutters typical of so many New Orleans homes.
For more details about NOMA’s sculpture and artwork, visit the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

Windows

Windows

Modern Art in City Park

Windows (1989)
Artist: John Scott
Location: Golf Drive
This colorful work is made up of a series of seven welded steel rectangles balanced at various angles. The rectangles are painted in stripes of orange, blue, green, violet, and red.
 

Singing Oak

Singing Oak

Singing Oak
Artist: Jim Hart
Location: At Big Lake, near the intersection of Wisner and Lelong in the John S. McIlhenny Meadow
City Park’s “Singing Oak” tree is strung with a set of wind chimes that ring a pentatonic (five notes per octave) scale – proof positive that there’s always music in the air in New Orleans! One of the chimes in “Singing Oak” stretches 14-feet long.

Water Goddess

Water Goddess

Fountains

Water Goddess (circa 1930)
Artist: Enrique Alférez
Location: Intersection near Roosevelt Mall and Victory Avenue
This Art Deco cast stone statue was created by artist Enrique Alférez during the WPA era. It was moved from a less prominent area in one of City Park’s lagoons to its current location at the edge of the Roosevelt Mall.
 

Owen/Butler Memorial Fountain

Owen/Butler Memorial Fountain

Owen/Butler Memorial Fountain (1910, 1929)
Location: City Park Avenue near N. Hennessy Street in the Old Grove
The original fountain and sculpture, Unfortunate Boot, was a memorial for William Frazer Owen, Jr., donated by his parents. In 1929, the sculpture was replaced by the bronze statue of a water nymph, Chloe. In 1994, the fountain was restored in honor of Patrick J. Butler. 

Walter Jahncke Fountain

Walter Jahncke Fountain

Walter Jahncke Fountain (1961)
Location: Dreyfous Ave., across from Morning Call Café
This contemporary fountain once featured colored lights that changed with the water’s spray patterns. It was donated to City Park by the prominent New Orleans family of Walter Jahncke, and was similar to a fountain located on the Jahncke estate in St. Tammany.

Hyams Fountain

Hyams Fountain

Hyams Fountain (1921)
Location: Inside the Carousel Gardens entrance
Sara Lavinia Hyams bequeathed the sale of her personal jewelry collection – valued at $30,000 in 1914 – to fund the building of fountains in both City Park and Audubon Park. (Hyams also left a sizable collection of paintings to the New Orleans Museum of Art.) The fountain’s plaque reads, “Given to the little children of New Orleans,” with a second inscription reading, “By bequest Mrs. Chapman H. Hyams left her jewels to Audubon and City Parks, the proceeds of which were to build a testimonial of her love for her home city. This fountain was erected March 1921 in a faithful endeavor to realize her wishes. She loved the beautiful and gave that all might enjoy.”

center of Popp Fountain

center of Popp Fountain

Popp Fountain (1937)
This magnificent, 60-foot-wide fountain contains underwater lighting and a dramatic 30-foot spray of water from a cast bronze sculpture of leaping dolphins designed by artist Enrique Alferez. The fountain recently underwent a significant restoration. An upper and lower promenade surround the fountain, which is bordered by 26 Corinthian columns draped in wisteria and walkways landscaped with native flora.
There is some confusion about the funding and dedication of Popp Fountain, which was the result of a $25,000 donation to City Park. Some sources claim Rebecca Grant Popp (John Popp’s wife) and Isabel Grant (Rebecca’s sister) donated the money for a memorial fountain and several other projects in the park. Other sources claim the fountain was a gift from Isabel Grant, who requested the Olmsted Brothers design the fountain in honor of Rebecca and John Popp, who died in 1918.

Monteleone Pillars

Monteleone Pillars

Architecture

Monteleone Pillars (1914)
These 25-foot marble pylons mark the Esplanade Avenue entrance of City Park and were erected in memory of park commissioner Antonio Monteleone. The pillars feature eight bronze lamps and 600-pound capstones. In 2012, the Monteleone family donated money to add LED lights to each pillar. The pillars can be lit for special occasions, such as red and green lights for Celebration in the Oaks.
 

Pichot Stone Bridge

Pichot Stone Bridge

Pichot Stone Bridge (1902)
This rough-hewn cobblestone bridge was dedicated in the memory of Henrietta M. Leonie Pichot for her gift of $192.00 in 1901 to City Park.

Looking for it in modern day City Park? Coming down Dreyfous, it's on your right before you cross Anseman Avenue. It leads to a tiny peninsula of land overlooking Bayou Metairie. There is water underneath this bridge only some of the time (depending on how high the bayou is at the time).

Langles Bridge

Langles Bridge

Langles Bridge (1902)
Dedicated in the memory of Angele M. Langles for her gift of $650.00 to City Park. Historical note: Ms. Langles and her mother died on July 4, 1898 when the French steamboat La Bourgogne sank after colliding with a British ship in the North Atlantic.

Goldfish Bridge (circa 1902)
This stone bridge leads to Goldfish Island, across Bayou Metairie from the Peristyle, and can be reached from the Old Grove along City Park Avenue. The bridge is sponsored by the McLoughlins (2013).

Dreyfous Bridge, Plaque and Cartouche (1924)
Mr. Felix J. Dreyfous was one of eight New Orleanians who played a vital role in the development and nurturing of City Park in its earliest years. Dreyfous spent decades working to improve City Park, writing the park’s original charter and the legislative bill for park funding, and creating and serving on NOMA’s board of trustees. Mr. and Mrs. Felix J. Dreyfous donated the Dreyfous Avenue Bridge in 1924, replacing a wooden bridge. Locals often call it the “Tickle Bridge” for the stomach “flip-flop” it gives car passengers as they travel over its peak. 

Thomas Day Bridge

Thomas Day Bridge

Thomas Day Bridge (1911)
This modern concrete bridge behind the Casino Building is a memorial to Thomas Day, who bequeathed $1500 to the City Park in 1910.

Popp Bandstand

Popp Bandstand

Popp Bandstand (1917)
Mr. John F. Popp was frequent park visitor with a penchant for classical architecture and music. Previous music platforms in this location had been rebuilt several times, and Popp was determined to construct a bandstand for the park in harmony with other new buildings. In 1916, Popp made a donation to the park to build the Popp Bandstand (located between the Peristyle and Morning Call), which was designed by architect Emile Weil. Popp Bandstand was dedicated on July 4, 1917 during a rare wartime festival. To see a 360degree view of the modern day Popp Banstand click here.

Popp Fountain

Popp Fountain

Popp Fountain (1937)
This magnificent, 60-foot-wide fountain contains underwater lighting and a dramatic 30-foot spray of water from a cast bronze sculpture of leaping dolphins designed by artist Enrique Alferez. The fountain recently underwent a significant restoration. An upper and lower promenade surround the fountain, which is bordered by 26 Corinthian columns draped in wisteria and walkways landscaped with native flora.
There is some confusion about the funding and dedication of Popp Fountain, which was the result of a $25,000 donation to City Park. Some sources claim Rebecca Grant Popp (John Popp’s wife) and Isabel Grant (Rebecca’s sister) donated the money for a memorial fountain and several other projects in the park. Other sources claim the fountain was a gift from Isabel Grant, who requested the Olmsted Brothers design the fountain in honor of Rebecca and John Popp, who died in 1918.

Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn

Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn

Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn (2010)
One of the newest additions to City Park, this three-acre swath of green sweeps from the Peristyle on Dreyfous Avenue to the Storyland entrance on Victory Avenue and is collectively known as the Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn. Promenades bordering the lawn on the east and west are flanked by 52 16-foot tall Medjool date palms. Each corner of the lawn has a square, open-sided pavilion with brick columns. Four “swing arbors” dot the lawn’s walkways; each contains three swings similar to those found on front porches across the South. Six additional, double-sided swings bearing the park's initials sit in the large arbor along Victory Avenue, directly opposite the Peristyle. The arbor features a gorgeous water display, designed to run off of the roof in thin streams that flow into the fountain.

Peristyle

Peristyle

Peristyle (1907)
Built as a platform for dancing, the Peristyle was designed by architect Paul Andry for the price of $15,330 in 1907. The Peristyle, originally called the paristyleum, was renovated in the 1930s in conjunction with other WPA projects, and again in 1989 with a generous donation from Mea and Vincent Saia. The Peristyle underwent another significant renovation in 2012.

Storyland (1956)
Filled with more than 25 larger-than-life storybook sculptures, Storyland puts the “fun” in functional art. It was designed as an imaginative playground and dedicated to the Children of New Orleans in memory of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Batt, the grandparents of New Orleans-born actor Brian Batt. Coleen Salley, a colorful local character and writer beloved for her work in children’s literature, is memorialized in a sculpture here – sitting on a bench with her famous book character, Epossumondas. Storyland is also home to the iron Storyteller Gazebo, a quaint relic of the park’s past and one of the oldest surviving structures in the park. Storyland is one of the most popular spots for birthday parties in City Park.

Carousel Building

Carousel Building

Carousel Building (1906)
City Park’s antique carousel is one of the most popular and historic attractions – one of only 100 antique wooden carousels in the country and the only carousel of its kind in Louisiana. The carousel was designed by acclaimed carvers Looff and Carmel and features 30 jumping horses and 21 standing horses (which locals call the “flying horses”), three menagerie animals (one giraffe, one lion, one camel) and two chariots. The carousel is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and a post-Katrina renovation of the carousel in 2007 garnered national attention and praise from the National Historic Preservation Society. (The carousel sat in 10 inches of water for about three weeks after Hurricane Katrina. The platform and deck buckled and had to be replaced, and the riding animals required significant restoration.) Every year, skilled artisans from the Loof and Carmel Company visit City Park to repaint the animals.

Colombier de Carol (1928)
Known as the City Park Pigeonnier, this free-standing structure was designed by Felix Dreyfous and donated to the park in 1928. A “pigeonnier” is just what the name suggests – a house for pigeons, also known as a colombier. The structure, which was refurbished in 2005 before Hurricane Katrina, is located on Pigeon Island behind the Casino Building.

Casino Building / Timken Center

Casino Building / Timken Center

Casino Building / Timken Center (1912 / 2000)
The Casino, an example of Spanish Mission Revival architecture, was built in 1912 and served as a refreshment stand and administrative center for City Park. Although technically a “cantina” (a place where refreshments are served), as the story goes, the strong local accent transformed the word into “ca-sin-a” and eventually “casino”. The upper floor of the Casino was converted into Parkview Terrace, a popular event space. In 2000, after a renovation, the building was renamed the Timken Center. In 2012, Morning Call opened in the ground floor of the building, adjacent to the gift shop and public restrooms. The ground floor of the building is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Pizzati Gate

Pizzati Gate

Pizzati Gate (1910)
The Pizzati Gate, with its brilliant archway lights spelling “City Park” at night, stands at the original entrance to City Park at City Park Avenue and Anseman Avenue (originally called the Alexander Street entrance). The archway was built with a donation from steamboat Captain Salvatore Pizzati, a Sicilian who immigrated to New Orleans and made his fortune in the shipping industry in New Orleans. The gate was re-dedicated in 2001 in memory of Edgar Luminais.

Great War Memorial

Great War Memorial

Great War Memorial (Date Unknown)
The military statue honoring war veterans is located in City Park east of the Pizzati Gate.

Blue Star Memorial plaque and statue

Blue Star Memorial plaque and statue

Blue Star Memorial plaque and statue (2002)
Blue Star Memorial plaques honor the men and women in the U.S. Armed Forces on designated highways, memorial markers and by-ways – a program launched in 1945, after World War II, by the National Council of State Garden Clubs. City Park’s Blue Star Memorial is one of 14 in the Greater New Orleans area, and one of only 2 By-Way markers (the other is located in Lafreniere Park). The marker was donated by the Federated Council of New Orleans Garden Club in 2002.

Dueling Oak sign

Dueling Oak sign

Dueling Oak sign

(as of September 2013 this sign has been taken down for restoration)
The towering oak near the foot of the Dreyfous Bridge is significant for a number of reasons, including the tree’s unique sign. It is one of the last remaining hand-painted by Mrs. Joy Luke, a benefactor whose signs were once found throughout the park. Once upon a time, the Dueling Oaks were the scene of some of New Orleans’ most colorful confrontations in New Orleans history – the place where men fought duels with pistols, sabers and swords in the early 1800s. Although outlawed in 1855, duels under the oaks continued until the practice fell out of favor around 1890. One of the two oaks was lost in a hurricane in 1949. When this oak was removed, workers discovered a pair of eyeglasses that a local optometrist dated as approximately 100 years old; two large knives were also found at the site.  The remaining Dueling Oak serves as a reminder of times past in the city’s intriguing history.

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard Statue

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard Statue

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard Statue (1915)
Alexander Doyle’s bronze statue, located in the circular plot on Esplanade Avenue at the entrance of City Park, depicts the Confederate General P. G. T. Beauregard astride a prancing horse. Beauregard was born in St. Bernard Parish and served as a prominent general during the Civil War. Doyle sculpted numerous marble and bronze statues of war heroes, including the statue of Robert E. Lee at Lee Circle. The Beauregard statue was built in stages, with the base dedicated on May 28, 1913 and the statue on November 11, 1915. The entire ensemble stands 27 feet tall from foundation and granite base to the highest point on the statue. The statue was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

Bacher Sundial

Bacher Sundial

Bacher Sundial (1963)
The Bacher Sundial was donated to the park by the family of Albert F. Bacher, a City Park board member. The sundial is located behind the Casino Building near Bayou Metairie.

Allard Plantation marker

Allard Plantation marker

Allard Plantation marker (1968)
At the corner of Carrollton Avenue and City Park Avenue along Bayou St. John, a marker recognizes the location of Allard Plantation, a swath of land approximately 18 x 43 “arpents” (a French unit for parcels of land) that would later become City Park. John McDonogh, the owner of the plantation in 1850, died and left the land to the City of New Orleans. With grand plans for a public park in mind, the city kept 85 acres of the plantation and sold the rest. The marker reads, “Allard Planation – Plantation of Louis Allard was purchased by his grandfather, Don Santiago Lorreins in 1770’s from estate of Francisco Hery, called Duplanty, builder of the first Cabildo Building in N.O. in 1845 by J. McDonough—given to N.O. in 1850.”

Schoen Centennial Gazebo / Vixen Hill Gazebo (1991)
The Vixen Hill Gazebo, a popular picnic and rest spot located inside the entrance of the Carousel Garden Amusement Park, replaced a previous structure that was built on this site in 1954.

Stanley Ray sculpture in City Putt (2014)

Artist: Kim Bernadas

For more information on the piece and Ray's life, please click here

Jendiva

Artist: Michael Dunbar

Location: On Roosevelt Mall near Tad Gormely Stadium

Jendiva is welded steel and measures 11 x 9 x 8 feet.

For almost four decades, Michael Dunbar has worked continuously as a professional sculptor, building monumental, abstract works of art in steel and bronze. Dunbar’s pieces are both imaginative and functional. Concepts of time, distance, and space run concurrently throughout Dunbar’s body of work. These concepts take a formal expression through the meticulous precision and connection of arcs, planes, and beams.  Dunbar’s work often conjures imagery of mechanical objects used to move and measure the earth, explore sky & space, and transport across vast distances. Forms are balanced to imply a sense of movement - as if they are at rest, waiting to be turned on or caught and frozen in the midst of action.

Dunbar creates model versions, which he refers to as 'Machinist Studies,' and courtyard sized versions of the monumental scale pieces.

Dunbar was recently profiled in the Art & Antiques September 2016 issue.

Jendiva is gift from Michael and Susie McLoughlin.

For more information about the artist, please visit michaeldunbarsculpture.com.

Plaques and Markers of the Park

WPA Bridges of City Park

TWEETS FROM THE PARK:

CITY PARK FACTS:

The Great Lawn is a green space open to all visitors, but please remember a few rules: No organized sports, cleats or tent spikes are allowed on the Great Lawn.