Tourist/Temporary Permit

NOLA City Bark

Visiting NOLA and need a temporary permit?
If you are visiting our city or have out-of town guests coming to our city for vacation, you can purchase a temporary pass for one week for $10 or a two week pass for $15.

Guests can download the temorary permit application here or link at the bottom of this page.

Completed forms can be mailed - with a check made payable to City Park - or with credit card information to NOLA City Bark, #1 Palm Drive, New Orleans, LA 70124, or faxed to (504) 483-9412, or emailed to info@nolacitybark.org. 

NOLA City Bark swipe cards may be picked up at the dog park office, #1 Palm Dr., Monday–Friday between the hours of 8am and 5pm. 

If you are unable to pick up during these hours the card can be mailed to you for a $5 fee. Please call the dog park to discuss at  (504) 483-9377.

Temporary permit holders will be given an electronic swipe card which must be returned to the Dog Park Office at the end of the week or 14 day use.

Rules:
Guest pets have to be neutered, current on vaccinations and conform to all the other rules of the dog park.  All the dog park rules apply to human guests too.  Please remember that children under the age of eight,  for their safety, are not permitted in the dog park. 

Downloads:

Click for Temporary/Tourist Permit

TWEETS FROM THE PARK:

  • Join us for opening day on 2/29! Carousel Gardens Amusement Park is open: Saturdays and Sundays Feb. 29th through M… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
  • Did you know? The @botanicalgardennola is open 7 days a week from 10am to 5pm (last entry at 4:30pm)! Enter at 5 Vi… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
  • The Park is filled with a variety of playgrounds and play structures suited for kids of all ages. Best of all? Afte… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…

CITY PARK FACTS:

Dedicated in the memory of Angele M. Langles for her gift to the park, the Langles Bridge (1902) behind Casino Building is a popular for spot for wedding ceremonies and landscape painters. Angele and her mother died on the morning of July 4, 1898 when the French steamboat, La Bourgogne, sank after colliding with a British ship in the North Atlantic.